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  • Mediterranean diet as good as low calorie vegetarian diet for weight loss

    No difference was seen between a ‘no fish, no meat Vegetarian Diet’ (VD) and a Mediterranean Diet (MD) in terms of weight and fat loss, but the MD diet was better in terms of triglyceride and B-12 levels, and the VD lowered LDL cholesterol more. There are many articles about the benefits of a vegetarian or a vegan diet for…

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  • Colourful Mediterranean Diet linked to less heart attacks and strokes

    A global study led by Professor Ralph Stewart of Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand, has shown that adherence to the Rainbow Diet greatly reduced heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular risk. Following over 15,400 people globally showed the results did not change wherever the participant lived. The researchers built a point system. From every point closer to the perfect Rainbow Diet…

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  • Rainbow diet factors have anti-aging properties

    Researchers from Virginia Tech, Raoanoke College and the National Institute on Ageing in the USA believe a low carbohydrate diet and resveratrol, a compound found in red grape skins and red wine, each has an anti-ageing effect on the body. Using mice, they employed four variations in diet – a normal diet, one with restricted carbs and calories, one with…

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  • The Rainbow Diet and Lifestyle

    The evidence base for the colourful Mediterranean Diet is now huge. It started life as the ‘Seven Countries Study’ (those where olive trees grew) as long ago as the 1950s when researchers first compared the longevity of people living on the North shore of the Mediterranean with populations in Northern Europe and America. A further study in the mid-80s (Keys…

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  • Nuts, olive oil and breast cancer

    A Spanish study (part of PREDIMED) took three identical groups of women and followed them for 5 years. The first group ate a low-fat diet; the second ate a colourful Mediterranean Diet with the addition of 30 gms of mixed nuts a day; and the third group ate a Rainbow Diet with an extra 4 tea-spoonsful of olive oil a day. The group…

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  • Why is exercise good for us

    Exercise has enormous benefits for those with cancer Most of us realise that regular exercise and a healthy lifestyle reduces our risks of developing cancer,  whether we do something about it or not. What is less well known are the enormous benefits of exercise after a diagnosis of cancer. It improves  well-being and exercise increases the chances of cure (Table.1). …

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  • ‘Bioactive’ foods stop cancer stem cell re-growth

    Some foods help cancer stem cells re-grow; while others stop this Dr. Young S Kim of the National Cancer Institute in America has presented research findings (2012) that, if heeded, offer a potential breakthrough in cancer treatment. Put simply, in a world that has just discovered that at the heart of all cancers there are ´cancer stem cells´ and there…

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  • Eat your greens, your gut bacteria like them

    In fact, your commensal bacteria (the good guys) feed off a sugar called sulfoquinovose produced during normal photosynthesis. Certain ‘unharmful’ strains of E Coli in the gut break down this sugar and allow the commensal bacteria to digest sulphur (sulfur) and carbon helping them to be healthy and grow, quickly outnumbering and overwhelming any pathogens present in the gut. Dr.…

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  • Vitamin D can reduce gut inflammation

    Two articles in as many weeks confirm what CANCERactive has been telling readers for more than 12 years. Vitamin D is essential to your health. And if you cannot derive enough from sunshine, you should be taking supplements. 1. The University of Washington shows benefits of vitamin D in IBS, colitis and colorectal cancer It has long been thought that…

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  • Carrots reduce risk of breast cancer

    A study published I the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concludes that eating more than your far share of carrots can reduce breast cancer risk. Unfortunately this phenomenon had no effect on oestrogen-driven breast cancer, which accounts for about 75% of breast cancers. At the heart of the beneft is beta-carotene a vitamin available in nature in cis- and trans-…

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